Umělec magazine 2011/2 >> Operation Žofín, or: A Czech Voina List of all editions.
Operation Žofín, or: A Czech Voina
Umělec magazine
Year 2011, 2
6,50 EUR
8 USD
Send the printed edition:
Order subscription

Operation Žofín, or: A Czech Voina

Umělec magazine 2011/2

01.02.2011

Ivan Mečl | editorial | en cs de

“The state will not help slackers and delinquents who abuse government handouts,” said the Prime Minister. If his position was not filled by an idiot without talent or feeling, he might have said: “We will help those who have been pushed to the margins of society by twelve years of irresponsible politics, who have been pushed to the self-destructive use of already low welfare payments, or who have been abandoned to their desperate fate, often with no way out other than crime.” Is your prime minister also a fat, stupid idiot? These prime ministers run governments that harm us maladjusted delinquents and slackers. In return, we will harm them, too. We will paralyze the functioning of the state and murder the prime ministers.
We saved up for Operation Žofín by pooling our welfare payments. After midnight on June 16, we put on our borrowed upper middle class outfits (i.e., formal wear) and set out for Žofín Island. Pretending to be a group of aging intellectuals in our forties, we copied the behavior of nostalgic university graduates at their 25-year reunion. The kind of sentimental people who stroll, hand-in-hand, along Žofín. Five women and three men joined this dangerous enterprise.
Why Žofín? Because we had learned that the Prague 1 municipal district had decided to ban after-dark strolls along this famed Prague location: In order to save money, the city could no longer pay to light this expensive property, now in private hands, and so it was more efficient to enclose the entire locale in barbed wire and to lower a boom gate across the bridge. Inspired by the fascists’ advance into the Sudetenland, the two men—Filip Turek and Petr Urban—and I demonstratively tore down the gate while the women cut through the barbed wire. Then we quickly headed to the island’s edge to set a private boat rental station on fire. In the meantime, the island’s security guards—who had hidden in the bushes in the face of our superior numbers—managed to contact the municipal police. The officers caught up to us in several cars by the stone railing above the river, where we again pretended to be confused culture workers and pedagogues, although internally we were ready for battle. All the twelve police officers had to do was reject our offer for consultation. Of course, I managed to personally pour fuel on the fire when I twisted my hands behind my back against two police officers and roughly dragged them several dozen meters to their police cars. They probably still have dislocated shoulders. There, I forced them to put me in handcuffs, and refused to say a word so that the others could play their parts. Filip Turek pulled out his pre-1989 activist number known as “I’ll eat my ID,” and—under the pretence of testifying to my preceding actions—had three police officers jump on his back. On the way to the station, both of us handcuffed detainees taught the police officers the liberal cry of “Were you on Wenceslas Square twenty years ago? Well here’s your democracy—this is how it is!” in several versions (some of them obscene). Then we had them handcuff us to poles in the corridor of the Bartholomew Street police station for eight hours. We cunningly provided them with our fingerprints and listened to their well-intentioned advice, the occasional humorous story, and a couple of philosophical lectures about the value of civic life. At around eleven in the morning, the police let us go without filing a report, having realized that the whole thing was a kind of put-on on our part.
This time around, we managed not to die and thus confirm our superiority forever. But we still managed to humiliate the black-clothed bogeymen from the municipal police—that extended dildo of Prague power—in front of god and the world. Our next excursion is to the North Bohemian coalfields, where the president has his own flower-adorned excavator snorting the friendly coal. We might just properly fertilize those flowers.

Translated from Czech by Stephan von Pohl.




01.02.2011

Comments

There are currently no comments.

Add new comment

Recommended articles

African Vampires in the Age of Globalisation African Vampires in the Age of Globalisation
"In Cameroon, rumours abound of zombie-labourers toiling on invisible plantations in an obscure night-time economy."
An unsuccessful co-production An unsuccessful co-production
If you know your way around, you might discover that every month and maybe even every week you stand the chance to receive money for your cultural project. Successful applicants have enough money, average applicants have enough to keep their mouths shut, and the unsuccessful ones are kept in check by the chance that they might get lucky in the future. One natural result has been the emergence of…
No Future For Censorship No Future For Censorship
Author dreaming of a future without censorship we have never got rid of. It seems, that people don‘t care while it grows stronger again.
Le Dernier Cri and the black penis of Marseille Le Dernier Cri and the black penis of Marseille
We’re constantly hearing that someone would like to do some joint project, organize something together, some event, but… damn, how to put it... we really like what you’re doing but it might piss someone off back home. Sure, it’s true that every now and then someone gets kicked out of this institution or that institute for organizing something with Divus, but weren’t they actually terribly self…
04.02.2020 10:17
Where to go next?
out - archeology
S.d.Ch, Solitaires and Periphery Culture (a generation born around 1970)
S.d.Ch, Solitaires and Periphery Culture (a generation born around 1970)
Josef Jindrák
Who is S.d.Ch? A person of many interests, active in various fields—literature, theater—known for his comics and collages in the art field. A poet and playwright foremost. A loner by nature and determination, his work doesn’t meet the current trends. He always puts forth personal enunciation, although its inner structure can get very complicated. It’s pleasant that he is a normal person and a…
Read more...
australia
Spaghetti Sauce on Your Moo Shoo Pork
Charlie Citron
Read more...
Lithuania
Road trip Lithuania
Road trip Lithuania
Arunase Gudaitas
Aš menininkas — Aš save myliu Vincent van Gogh in one letter to his brother described a café as a place where one could easily go insane. The café in the Center for Contemporary Art (CAC) in Vilnius is such a place. Insider connoisseurs of the local scene consider it “very bohemian” and, indeed, in contrast to traditionally lackluster and overpriced eateries in museums, the atmosphere in the CAC…
Read more...
reportáž
Under the Shadow of Heroes
Under the Shadow of Heroes
Alena Boika
Read more...
Books, video, editions and artworks that might interest you Go to e-shop
The Immortal Man Bag Journal of Art | Complete collection of printed editions. Featuring Man Bag No.6 for the first time | Text...
More info...
33 EUR
40 USD
Fountain, 1995, silkscreen print, 44 x 27,5 cm
More info...
65 EUR
79 USD
More info...
2,50 EUR
3 USD
Limited edition of 10. Size 100 x 70 cm. Black print on durable white foil.
More info...
75 EUR
91 USD

Studio

Divus and its services

Studio Divus designs and develops your ideas for projects, presentations or entire PR packages using all sorts of visual means and media. We offer our clients complete solutions as well as all the individual steps along the way. In our work we bring together the most up-to-date and classic technologies, enabling us to produce a wide range of products. But we do more than just prints and digital projects, ad materials, posters, catalogues, books, the production of screen and space presentations in interiors or exteriors, digital work and image publication on the internet; we also produce digital films—including the editing, sound and 3-D effects—and we use this technology for web pages and for company presentations. We specialize in ...
 

Citation of the day. Publisher is not liable for any mental and physical states which may arise after reading the quote.

Enlightenment is always late.
CONTACTS AND VISITOR INFORMATION The entire editorial staff contacts

DIVUS LONDON

 

STORE
Arch 8, Resolution Way, Deptford

London SE8 4NT, United Kingdom
Open on appointment

 

OFFICE
7 West Street, Hastings
East Sussex, TN34 3AN
, United Kingdom
Open on appointment
 

Ivan Mečl
ivan@divus.org.uk, +44 (0) 7526 902 082

DIVUS
NOVA PERLA
Kyjov 37, 407 47 Krásná Lípa
Czech Republic
divus@divus.cz
+420 222 264 830, +420 602 269 888

Open daily 10am to 6pm
and on appointment.

 

DIVUS BERLIN
Potsdamer Str. 161, 10783 Berlin
Germany

berlin@divus.cz, +49 (0) 1512 9088 150
Open on appointment.

 

DIVUS WIEN
wien@divus.cz
DIVUS MEXICO CITY
mexico@divus.cz
DIVUS BARCELONA
barcelona@divus.cz
DIVUS MOSCOW & MINSK

alena@divus.cz

DIVUS NEWSLETTER SUBSCRIPTION
Divus New book by I.M.Jirous in English at our online bookshop.